Field Trips 2024

Check out our field trip options below for Thursday and Friday!

Thursday, 9/19 Morning Field Trip Option 1

Keller Mohawk Hill Public Conservation Area

The Tug Hill Tomorrow Land Trust's Conservation Director, John Souva, will be providing this tour to talk about conservation efforts in the Tug Hill region and this specific site, which was donated to the Land Trust in 2022 and restored to open wetland by Ducks Unlimited. Conservation efforts in the Tug Hill region are important as this region is one of the most rural and remote areas in the state with 117,000 acres of wetlands and 4,000 miles of streams. 

Black River Environmental Improvement Association (BREIA)

BREIA will be providing an educational hike at their Jackson Hill Sunfield Trails location. BREIA’s goal is to conserve, maintain, and enhance the scenic and historical values of the Adirondack and Tug Hill Region. They have one of the largest classic cross-country ski, snowshoe, and mountain biking trail systems in the east. BREIA has their Black River Outdoor Education Program to establish awareness, appreciation, and understanding of the environment by providing students with educational lessons in geology, ecology, biology, and history. BREIA is a vital non-profit that helps educate students about the Tug Hill region and offers the public outdoor recreation space. 

Both locations will provide a great experience in the outdoors of the Tug Hill region. These visits can be linked to the Environment and Recreation and Tourism sections of the virtual conference as well

Thursday, 9/19 Morning Field Trip Option 2

Constable Hall

Experience Constable Hall, the Jewel of the North Country. This historic house museum located in the Tug Hill region was built in the early 1800’s by William Constable, Jr. Constable Hall is the foundation of the North Country history. It’s important to understand the history of the Tug Hill region to appreciate what it offers today. William Constable is remembered best for his part in Macomb’s Purchase, the giant real estate speculation which included about a tenth of New York State. In selling huge tracts to European and American Land companies and in attracting individual families from New England, William Constable opened up the settlement of the North Country. At that time, the North Country region promised new settlers abundant natural resources including water and waterways, timber, and wildlife, most especially a plethora of beaver, which was vital for the fur trade. Managing those resources, both then and now, gets at the very heart of conservation. 

Black River Canal Museum

Next, you'll be able to learn about how one canal changed the ways of the North Country by visiting the Black River Canal Museum. The Black River Canal was influential in developing the Tug Hill region. The Black River Canal Museum will show, in an interactive way, how a waterway shaped the economy and layout of the Tug Hill region. The Black River Canal was principally built to supply much needed water to the Erie Canal at its high point in Rome, but it would also provide a means to transport massive amounts of timber products from the untouched vast forests of the Tug Hill and Western Adirondacks. The Black River Canal spurred the harvest of trees and sawmills sprung up to turn the logs into lumber that was shipped down the canal to the growing areas of Albany and New York City. Villages along the canal, like Boonville, greatly benefited from this new influx of prosperity as businesses flourished. 

Both locations will provide education about the foundations of the Tug Hill region and how the environment helped shape what Tug Hill is today. These visits can be linked to the Recreation and Tourism sections of the virtual conference as well. 

We'll break for lunch at the Pavilion at Lyons Falls Park and then continue the afternoon tours.

Thursday, 9/19 Afternoon Field Trip Option 1

This field trip is pending and will be confirmed within the next few weeks.

Humblebee Farms

Visit and learn about Humblebee Farms, "a local woman-owned and veteran-operated hydroponic farm dedicated to cultivating our community's freshest, healthiest, and most delectable varieties of vegetables." Humblebee Farms is vital to Tug Hill communities. They use cutting-edge growing techniques that are able to produce vegetables, microgreens, flowers, and herbs year-round. They are unique in how they grow in that they use less water, no soil, no pesticides or other harmful chemicals. It will be a great learning opportunity for attendees. 

Black River Valley Natural

Next, you'll be able to walk down the street and visit Black River Valley Natural and learn about how they're a micro-creamery and producer of small-batch artisanal foods. Black River Valley Natural is another vital business to Tug Hill communities.

Both locations are key to providing economic growth to the Tug Hill region. These visits can be linked to the Natural Resources Economy and Opportunities section of the virtual conference. 

Thursday, 9/19 Afternoon Field Trip Option 2

Agers Falls via Moose River Trail Hike

Explore and hike a scenic trail right in Lyons Falls called the Agers Falls via Moose River Trail Hike (you can find this on AllTrails). This two-mile out-and-back hike will provide great views of the Moose River and bring you to Agers Falls! Elevation gain is about 100 feet. Moose River is part of the Black River watershed, which runs along the eastern border of the Tug Hill region and the Adirondacks, before it empties into Lake Ontario. The Black River watershed has a 9 Element Watershed Plan and we will be hearing about that during the virtual conference as well. This visit can be linked to the Environment section of the virtual conference. 

Friday, 9/20 Field Trip Morning Only

Trenton Falls and Tour of Brookfield Renewable's Hydroelectric Facility

You'll get to tour Brookfield Renewable's hydroelectric facility and view the beautiful Trenton Falls, only open to the public once a year (and is additionally being opened for our field trip). Brookfield Renewable Power and the Town of Trenton developed the Trenton Falls Scenic Trail to offer the public an opportunity to experience local history while enjoying splendors of nature. You'll find scenic overlooks, wildlife observation, informational panels, views of the hydroelectric operation and facilities, picnic areas, and points of historic interest.